The Australian Golden Sash Awards Winners 2019: The Complete List

Photo Cedit: Team LifePhotos

The 2019 AGSA (Australian Golden Sash Awards) was recently held on Saturday at the City Tattersalls Club, and hundreds of Australian beauty queens graced the prestigious red carpet much to the delight of keen photographers and various media personalities. The event was a joint collaboration between StarCentral Magazine and MS Events Group – wherein MS Events Group was the main producer of the event while StarCentral was the media partner.

The Australian Golden Sash Awards is a ceremony aimed at showcasing Australian beauty queens who have made the most outstanding contributions to the pageant industry during the year. This annual event is a first of its kind in Australia and in its inaugural year, the cream of the crop in the beauty pageant world attended the high profile industry event in their beautiful sashes and glittery crowns. If you want to find out who the winners and grinners were at the 2019 Australian Golden Sash Awards then scroll down below:

Best Children’s pageant of the year: WINNER – Follow your Dreams by Kylie Drew

Follow your Dreams by Kylie Drew

Australasia Official by Maryrose Salubre

Diamond Pageant by Morgan Mancini and Charlie Mancini

Future Faces Charity Pageant by Kim Cancellier

Best pageant dress company of the year: WINNER – Visage Boutique by Kim Cancellier

Miracle Agency by Wendy Liu

Charlestown Gorgeous Gown

Visage Boutique by Kim Cancellier

Clapetra

Best pageant hairstylist of the year: WINNER – Celle Dionisio

Visi Carlyon

Celle Dionisio

Emma Christine

Suzi Dent

Best pageant makeup artist of the year: WINNER – Visi Carlyon (Photo Credit: Ronell Amper)

Samantha Ison

Visi Carlyon

Suzi Dent

Celle Dionisio

Best pageant Photographer of the year: WINNER – Raymond Bartholomeusz

Efren Padagas

Jim Kasif

Blake Jackson

Raymond Bartholomeusz

Best pageant host of the year: WINNER – Jojo Sebastian

MaryGrace Olegario

Jojo Sebastian

Anthony Wayne

Cole Sialeipata

Best Pageant Director of the year: WINNER – Charlie Mancini & Morgan Mancini

Jasmine Nichole

Hung Pham

Charlie Mancini & Morgan Mancini

Ferial Youakim

Best Pageant of the year: WINNER – Miss Diamond Australia

Miss International Australia

Miss World Australia

Miss Diamond Australia

Newcastle Miss Pageants

Social media queen of the year: WINNER – Analieze Bella Newton

Suzi Dent

Analieze Bella Newton

Ava Da Silva

Donemala Phanalasy

Miss Natural Beauty of the year: WINNER – Jasmine Grace Alessio

Sienna Cosgrove

Jasmine Grace Alessio

Paula Cuyugan

Madison Dowden

Charity queen of the year: WINNER – Chantelle O’Donohoe

Cora Bojarski

Sonny Turner

Chantelle O’Donohoe

Michelle Fleming

Miss Photogenic of the year: WINNER – Henna Perez

Kassandra Kashian

Henna Perez

Brielle Streater

Sangeetha Singh

Pageant king of the year: WINNER – Jordon King (Photo Credit: Ronell Amper)

Anthony Wayne

Jordon King

Amit Singh

Eden Dally

International queen of the year (19 and below): WINNER – Emmy Gelardi-Bunyi (Photo Credit: Team LifePhotos)

Jasmine Grace Alessio

Indyanna-Rose Ciccone

Kaelyn Theresa Coker

Emmy Gelardi-Bunyi

International queen of the year (20 and above): WINNER – Sue Turner (Photo Credit: Team LifePhotos)

Robbie Canner

Sue Turner

Nina Robertson

Maddy May

Most Promising Newcomer of the year (little Miss category): WINNER – Serenity Charles (Photo Credit: Ronell Amper)

Helena Ristevski

Serenity Charles

Maria Hall

Samantha Porsha

Most Promising Newcomer of the year (19 and below): WINNER – Summer Hogan

Patricia Tuivai

Summer Hogan

Madison Dowden

Jacquelyn Watts

Most Promising Newcomer of the year (20 and above): WINNER – Poonam Rani

Jen Louise

Jayde Crystal Wright

Poonam Rani

Nicole Smith

Humanitarian of the year (little Miss category): WINNER – Rica Lee Calimag

Emmy Gelardi-Bunyi

Rica Lee Calimag

Serenity Charles

Ailexah – Faye Bigorni

Humanitarian of the year (19 and below): WINNER – Kyla Sevilla Brack (Photo Credit: Ronell Amper)

Arundhati Banerjee

Kyla Sevilla Brack

Sonny Turner

Ruby Adamson

Humanitarian of the year (20 and above): WINNER – Nathalie Nicole

Analieze Bella Newton

Nathalie Nicole

Jennifer Hunt

Leanne Potter

Ultimate Role model of the year (little Miss category): WINNER – Ellie Bojarski

Keana Kearns

Ailexa May

Ava Da Silva

Ellie Bojarski

Ultimate Role model of the year (19 and below): WINNER – Destiny Lyons (Photo Credit: Ronell Amper)

Ruby Adamson

Nicola Mularczyk

Sienna Cosgrove

Destiny Lyons

Ultimate Role model of the year (20 and above): WINNER – Robbie Canner (Photo Credit: Ronell Amper)

Robbie Canner

Poonam Rani

Chantelle Odonohoe

Shaylah Bowman

Beauty Queen of the year (little miss category): WINNER – Ava Da Silva (Photo Credit: Team LifePhotos)

Serenity Charles

Chloe Lofthouse

Elli Bojarski

Ava Da Silva

Beauty Queen of the year (19 and below): WINNER – Kaelyn Theresa Coker

Kyla Sevilla Brack

Kaelyn Theresa Coker

Destiny Lyons

Arundhati Banerjee

Beauty Queen of the year (20 and above): WINNER – Cora Bojarski

Analieze Bella Newton

Sue Turner

Cora Bojarski

Chelsea-Anne Lewis

Character Vs. Beauty: Which One Is More Important??

Defining beauty as a concept is akin to holding sand in your hands. You can grasp at it and you certainly can seem to understand what it looks and feels like, but it is by no means solid. They say that beauty is in the eye of the beholder and this cliché certainly holds true. Approach anyone in the street and ask him or her to explain their ideal of beauty and you will undoubtedly get substantial variations in response. What you might come to discover is that defining beauty is closer to “I know it when I see it”.

It becomes very obvious then that defining beauty is as subjective as one’s taste in music. The search for it has spanned centuries – a relief in the tomb of the Egyptian nobleman Ptahhotep (who lived around 2400 BC) shows him getting a pedicure. Cleopatra wore kohl, a precursor to the modern eyeliner. Incarnations of what is considered ‘beautiful’ has ranged from breath-stealing corsets in the 19th century to achieve a tiny waist to our modern-day gravity-defying, ankle-threatening stilettos.

And that search is an expensive one! According to the National Geographic, in the US in 2015, $6 billion was spent on makeup, $8 billion each on hair and skincare. $20 billion was spent on diet products and services, and billions more on health club memberships and plastic surgery.

But what for? Experts from all different fields have weighed in to define beauty and why we search for it. Studies by anthropologist Don Symons at the University of California at Santa Barbara, and psychologist, David Perrett at St Andrews University in Scotland, all show that men consistently showed a preference for women with smooth skin, larger eyes, fuller lips, and a smaller nose and chin because “all these traits are reliable cues to youth, good health, and fertility.” Essential characteristics we instinctively know (honed over millennia) are vital for continuing the human race. However, that hard-wiring in our brain circuitry can be altered, especially by culture, according to Douglas Yu, a biologist from Great Britain whose studies, for example, found that indigenous tribes in Southeast Peru preferred body shapes regarded as overweight in western culture. “A fuller, evolutionary theory of human beauty must embrace variation,” says Yu.

So, who’s been shaping the modern definition of beauty? That modern definition that has us worshipping Victoria’s Secret models, A-list stars and beauty queens, and has us comparing our bodies to theirs? That has us modifying our eating habits that in an ever-growing number around the world, have resulted in eating disorders? That has us losing our sense of self-worth and self-esteem? It’s so easy to blame the media – magazines, TV, movies – as the culprit. But who buys those magazines, watches those TV shows, goes to the movies?

We do.

In a twisted sort of way, we ourselves have been responsible. What we watch, what we buy has inadvertently shaped what modern society now considers beautiful. So, in recognizing that, can we then be the instruments of change?

I am an aunt to three beautiful little girls and I find myself sometimes terrified when I think of the challenges that face them when they grow up. I was fortunate enough to have grown up surrounded by strong, confident women and in that most essential stage – the teenage years, the high school years – when your perception of yourself in relation to others is shaped, I was blessed to have had a group of friends who couldn’t care less what anybody else thought of them. They were proud of who they were and in the dreams and ambitions, they had for themselves. After high school, I again found myself, in the form of my two best friends and the women in my Christian youth group, with kindred spirits whose values and integrity meant more to them than superficial cares. I look back at those women, grateful that I knew them, and praying that my nieces will have women like them who will stand steadfast against today’s shallow perception of beauty.

When I was researching this article, I decided to have a look at the dictionary’s definition of beauty. According to Merriam Webster, beauty is:

– The quality of being physically attractive
– The qualities in a person or a thing that give pleasure to the senses or the mind.

Now that second part got me thinking… “qualities that give pleasure…” Isn’t that a healthier way of thinking about beauty? I mean, something can be physically attractive or ‘beautiful’ but deadly like a poisonous plant, and in that same vein, someone can be stunningly gorgeous but be a horrible person inside. So, I think instead of aiming to be beautiful, we should aim to be attractive. I mean, let’s face it, There is no way you can look like those models in the magazines. You know why? Because you don’t have the same genes they do, It’s as simple as that.

So, what do I mean about aiming to be attractive? Being attractive means that you’re the sort of person people are drawn to – like two magnets being pulled towards each other. Not drawn to you because of how gorgeous you look, but because they actually want to spend time with you. They are drawn to you because you are a person with a good heart, whose confidence and positive nature is just as irresistible as honey is to a bee. It’s a challenge, yes. And much more difficult for some to achieve than others but that’s what my circle of strong, confident women taught me – that my heart is more important than my face. Because ultimately, when I’m at my most unguarded when the only critic I face is me and I ask: “Do I love me?” and when I can say: “Yes”….that’s when I feel beautiful.

Introducing…. MS Magazine

MS Magazine is set to shake up the Australian media landscape, providing a publication purely focused on empowering women. MS magazine is a quarterly magazine founded by Maryrose Salubre and primarily marketed to women.

There are hundreds and thousands of magazines today, from fashion to beauty, to family, to house, to travel and more. MS magazine begs to differ from other publications as it aims to inspire and empower women. It’s an opportunity for the Maryrose Salubre, the National Director of Australasia Official and Mrs. Universe Australia to live and work her passion for inspiring and encouraging others using this platform – a print and online magazine.

Join in Maryrose Salubre’s journey to reach and inspire, by coming to the official magazine launch on May 26, 2018, at the Entertainment Dome, Club Burwood (96 Shaftesbury Rd, Burwood NSW 2134).

Rising Star Spotlight: Introducing Miss Rebecca Donney

She may lack the experience and the exposure in modeling and beauty pageants, but she certainly made up for it with her can-do attitude and undeniable grace and beauty. Rebecca Donney looked radiant as she was crowned Miss Teen Australasia Official 2016 First Runner-Up last year. You may be surprised to know that this was only her first time to join a beauty pageant.

She shared that one of the things she fancies about being in the contest is the opportunity to express her creativity. One thing that separates this gorgeous lass from the rest is her keen eye for the arts.   Currently, this beautiful young lady is earning a degree in Bachelor of Interior Architecture (Honours) at the University of New South Wales.

Moreover, when asked about what she likes most about the pageant, she tells us that the chance to represent different important companies such as the Shawl Group, Ayala Land International Sales Inc and the Campbell town & Region Filipino Community Council Inc. has been one of them. She feels honoured to represent these companies, which at the same time, raises awareness for the charities that the companies support through their sponsorship like the No Voices (Kids & Animals) Charity.

The pageant has not only changed her but also created a much stronger bond between her and her family. She is grateful for the undying support of her family and friends who had been one of things that kept her going throughout the whole road to her crown “If they find that what I’m doing is what I love and they know that I will enjoy it, they will continue to support me,” she shared.

We can really expect a lot of amazing things from this young beauty queen, who plans to continue participating in beauty pageants. She also wants to focus on pursuing a career in the creative industry, particularly interior architecture.